A collection of things. Thoughts, images, and everything else. Serious or comedic, intellectual or trivial.

Likely to be mostly history, Russian literature, stuff about Central/Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, various fandoms as they happen to strike me (Les Mis, Tolkien, Doctor Who, at this point a bit of Supernatural, too...), dogs (behavior, training, genetics), nature, cool buildings, animal behavior, and... anything else that happens to appeal to me.

About me... I'm 22. I have a degree in Russian studies. I work as a book scanner--a vast improvement over cashiering in a hardware store! I'm from Michigan. I'm studying for a masters in historic preservation. I identify as a Polish-American. I have a slight love affair with the city of Kiev after spending a summer there. I had a Finnish Lapphund for 12 years. Someday I will have a Kai Ken. This seems to cover most of what I've been asked, but feel free to ask me anything else you want to know!

 

In der Dichtung schlägt das Herz eines Volkes und sein Gewissen.

The heart and conscience of a nation beats in its poetry.

Klabund (Alfred Henschke, 1890 – 1928), German writer

(via thatswhywelovegermany)

belannat:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts 

It’s even more tragic that that’s what actually happened

And that is the quotation on the monument now, too.
Furthermore, Heinrich Heine was Jewish. He converted to Christianity later in his life, largely (from what I’ve read) as the result of professional antisemitism, and they say that decision tormented him for the rest of his life. He still never got the job he was promised, still because of antisemitism.
It is said that it is a testament to Heine and his work that even the Nazis could not totally purge him from German literary canon, despite everything.

belannat:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts

It’s even more tragic that that’s what actually happened

And that is the quotation on the monument now, too.

Furthermore, Heinrich Heine was Jewish. He converted to Christianity later in his life, largely (from what I’ve read) as the result of professional antisemitism, and they say that decision tormented him for the rest of his life. He still never got the job he was promised, still because of antisemitism.

It is said that it is a testament to Heine and his work that even the Nazis could not totally purge him from German literary canon, despite everything.

Russia Steps Up Help for Rebels in Ukraine War

visirion:

KIEV, Ukraine — Rather than backing down after last week’s downing of a civilian passenger jet, Russia appears to be intervening more aggressively in the war in eastern Ukraine in what American and Ukrainian officials call a dangerous escalation that will almost certainly force more robust retaliation from the United States and Europe.

Russia has increased its direct involvement in fighting between the Ukrainian military and separatist insurgents, moving more of its own troops to the border and preparing to arm the rebels with ever more potent weapons, including high-powered Tornado rocket launchers, American and Ukrainian officials said on Friday.

The officials, citing satellite images and other military intelligence, said that Russia had positioned heavy weapons, including tanks and other combat vehicles, at several points along the border where there has been intense fighting. On Thursday, Russia unleashed artillery attacks on eastern Ukraine from Russian territory, officials in Washington and Kiev said. While Russia flatly denied accelerating its intervention on Friday, American and Ukrainian officials said Moscow appeared anxious to stem gains by government forces that have succeeded in retaking some rebel-held territory.

The reported Russian moves raised the prospect of a new and more perilous chapter opening in a conflict that has already inflamed the region and, with the destruction of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 with 298 aboard, stunned the world. American officials blamed a Russian-provided surface-to-air missile for the explosion and hoped the shock of the episode would prompt the Kremlin to rethink its approach, but they are increasingly convinced it has not.

Obama administration officials said Russia’s rising involvement had stiffened the resolve of European leaders who have been reluctant to confront Moscow for fear of damaging their own economies. But there was no appetite for a direct military response, and it remained unclear whether the West could or would take action that may change the calculus of President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia as Moscow seems to devote more firepower to the fight.

American and Ukrainian officials said Russia has moved beyond simply helping separatists and is now engaging directly in the war. Multiple Ukrainian military planes have been brought down in recent days by missiles fired from Russian territory, and now artillery batteries are firing from across the border into Ukraine, the officials said.

“We have detected that firing and that does represent an escalation in this conflict,” said Josh Earnest, the White House press secretary. “It only underscores the concerns that the United States and the international community has about Russian behavior and the need for the Putin regime to change their strategy.”

American officials said Russia has moved 15,000 troops near the border. Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters that Russia had made “imminent” plans to deliver heavier rockets to the separatists. Instead of Mr. Putin de-escalating the conflict after the Malaysia Airlines tragedy, “he’s actually taken a decision to escalate,” Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a security forum in Aspen, Colo.

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. called President Petro O. Poroshenko of Ukraine to express solidarity and pledge to coordinate with allies “about imposing further costs on Russia for its deeply destabilizing and irresponsible actions in Ukraine,” the White House said in a statement.

While the United States has been hesitant to make its intelligence public, Ukrainian officials have provided a daily, running list of Russian incursions, including flights into Russian air space by fighter jets and unmanned surveillance drones, as well as mortar and rocket attacks.

“We have facts of shelling of Ukrainian positions from the territory of Russian Federation,” Andriy Lysenko, a spokesman for Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council, said at a briefing in Kiev on Friday. “We have facts on the violation of air border between Ukraine and Russia.”

Mr. Lysenko said there were active-duty Russian soldiers who had surrendered, as well as volunteer Russian fighters who had been captured. “We have information about weapons and mercenaries who have respective skills for warfare, who have been passing over from the territory of the Russian Federation,” Mr. Lysenko said.

Russia pointedly denied the American allegations on Friday. In a statement, the Russian Foreign Ministry accused the United States of engaging in a “smear campaign.”

“All of this is accompanied by references to some ‘evidence’ allegedly available to the United States,” the ministry said. “Not one of these ‘evidences,’ however, has been shown, which is not surprising. Facts and specifics to support false allegations simply do not exist.”

On Friday, the European Union took another step toward imposing additional economic penalties focused on the financial, energy and military sectors of the Russian economy, but a letter to European leaders from Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council, made clear that officials were still struggling to find a balance.

Mr. Lysenko, the military spokesman, said that Ukrainian troops were coming under increased fire from the Russian side of the border, and that the Ukrainian military had recently shot down three Russian surveillance drones. One was used to target a Ukrainian base near the town of Amvrosiivka, which then quickly came under heavy rocket attack, he said.

Ukrainian officials say their forces have recaptured at least 10 towns, shrinking the amount of territory under rebel control in the embattled regions of Luhansk and Donetsk and gaining substantial advantage, including over some of the main highways in the region.

The recent gains by Ukrainian forces included the recapture of the city of Lysychansk after days of fighting. The city of more than 100,000 had been a rebel stronghold, and it posed a strategic obstacle to government troops pressing through the Luhansk region from the north and west. Ukrainian ground troops needed air support to expel the rebels, but were able to push them south and out of the city.

Officials have said they believed that they could defeat the rebels within three weeks if there were no further intervention by Russia.

By placing forces close to the border, the Russians can provide fire support to the separatists, prevent Ukrainian troops from establishing control over the border and facilitate the delivery of Russian arms to the separatists. The Ukrainian military has expressed frustration that at least two sections of the border remain porous. One goal of the Russian attacks on targets, an American official said, is to keep Ukrainian forces away from the border, making it easier for Russia to transport weapons and cooperate with the insurgents.

“The quantity and sophistication of weaponry being sent by Russia across the border is increasing,” one Western official said on Friday, adding that Russian artillery units have been firing into Ukraine from Russian territory “in direct support of separatists.” Like other officials with access to classified intelligence assessments, he spoke on the condition of anonymity.

blastedheath:

Józef Mehoffer (Polish, 1869-1946), Decoration design for Armenian Cathedral in Lviv, 1907. Gouache on paper, 66 x 72 cm. National Museum, Krakow.

blastedheath:

Józef Mehoffer (Polish, 1869-1946), Decoration design for Armenian Cathedral in Lviv, 1907. Gouache on paper, 66 x 72 cm. National Museum, Krakow.

bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On June 6, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, and he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark of the state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin. Knowing the Germans from which he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the West, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On June 6, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, and he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark of the state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin. Knowing the Germans from which he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the West, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

a-swiftly-tilting-dwarf-planet:

So here’s a map of anti-semitic attacks that have happened worldwide this year. It’s pretty cool, bc you can click on a little balloon and it will tell you what the instance of anti-semitism was, like “Jew stabbed in Tunisia”, or “Nazi-themed cafe in Indonesia reopens” which is interesting because “reopens”. Like, this isn’t even the first time that cafe has been open! And then you can zoom in, like, a lot of terrible shit’s been happening to Jews in France, so you can zoom towards Paris and see things like “Teens and grandfather chased by hatchet-wielding assailant” or “Jewish girl assaulted for wearing Star of David”.

And of course, they also keep a day-to-day list of anti-semitic actions worldwide.

So if you think that anti-semitism is something that doesn’t happen in your area, or it’s something that’s just been happening in select places since the attacks on Gaze two weeks ago, then you really should educate yourself. Take a little time to scroll through the list of attacks, and take note of the dates. The website only goes back to 2011, but this has been happening to Jews for literally thousands of years.

lodubimvloyaar:

youngblackandvegan:

burdenedwithgloriousbooty:

feuerbaech:

dagwolf:

Fuck PETA. They’re offering to help ten families in Detroit with their bills if they agree to become vegan.

JUST WOW 

FUCK PETA

Holy shit that is some straight up white saviour missionary style bullshit. Only with quinoa instead of bibles. 

we will help you

but only ONLY if you accept tofu as your lord and savior

21st century Souperism.

Where are they even supposed to be getting nutritionally-complete vegan food?

The Meijer store that opened in Detroit about a year ago (they’re planning to open a second location, too) made news because it became the only large grocery store in the city.

The suburbs abound with grocery stores, and there are some smaller stores even in Detroit and in the towns surrounding. Hamtramck especially has a lot of ethnic groceries and is very nearly surrounded by Detroit (and served by Detroit buses). There are some farmers’ markets in the city, not to mention Eastern Market.

But access to healthy food is still very difficult for many Detroiters. Unless PETA intends on providing them with their food, delivered to their doorsteps and for free, this sounds like an invitation to malnutrition (and no, I’m not saying that convenience store food isn’t—rather that there are some serious challenges for Detroit’s neighborhoods when it comes to food already) in addition to all its other problems.

Though at the same time, how exactly do they plan on enforcing the “only if you go vegan” rule?

As per histoireinsolite's request, meatless golabki recipes. These are all (paraphrased for the long ones, quoted for the shorter) from Robert and Maria Strybel's Polish Heritage Cookery, which has more recipes than I will ever know what to do with.

Stuffed Cabbage with Mushroom Filling

6-8 oz. mushrooms, washed and diced
3 tbsp butter
2 tbsp water
2 onions, finely chopped

Simmer the above ingredients, covered, for about 15 minutes. Uncover and allow to steam off moisture.

1 1/2 c. cooked rice
2 eggs
2 tbsp chopped dill
Salt
Pepper

Combine with the mushroom mixture above. Bread crumbs may be added to reduce moisture.

Fill cabbage leaves with mixture and place in baking pan.The recipe suggests cooking together 1 tbsp flour, 1 tbsp butter, and 1 cup court-bouillon to make a sauce/broth that is then poured over the golabki before they go in the oven, but it sounds like any liquid with some flavor will work just as well (especially mushroom broth).

Cover, bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes. Suggests serving with either a butter-and-bread-crumbs sauce, or sour cream sauce with mushrooms.

Cabbage Rolls with Groats and Mushrooms

12-16oz mushrooms,cleaned and chopped
3 tbsp butter
2 onions, chopped

Simmer the above until tender.

3 c. cooked buckwheat groats (kasza)1 tbsp chopped parsley
2 eggs
Salt
Pepper

Combine with mushroom mixture, then fill cabbage leaves. Put in baking pan, add 2 c. court-bouillon or cabbage water, bake at 350 for about 2 hours. Suggested to serve with a mushroom sauce.

Cabbage Rolls with Mushrooms and Eggs
"Soak 1 stale, broken-up kaiser roll in 1/2 c. milk until soggy and grind. Wash well and dice 12 oz. wild or domestic fresh mushrooms and simmer in 3-4 Tbsp butter with 2 chopped onions 15-20 minutes, or until fully cooked. When cool, combine with ground roll, 3 T. uncooked instant cream of wheat, and 3 finely-chopped or ground hard-boiled eggs. Add 1 T. or more chopped parsley and/or dill, mix well, and salt & pepper to taste. Fill cabbage leaves with mixture. Place in roaster, add 2 c. court-bouillon, and bake at 350 1 1/2 hours. Drench with onion sauce on platter."

Cabbage Rolls with Groats and Cheese

"Dice and lightly brown 1 fairly large onion in 3 T butter. Combine with 3 c. cooked buckwheat groats and 1/2 lb grated or ground farmer’s cheese (homemade or store-bought). Stir in 2 raw eggs and mix well. Season with salt, pepper, marjoram, and a little sugar. Fill cabbage leaves, place golabki in pan, add 2 c. court-bouillon, and bake in 350 oven about 1 1/2 hours. Drench in sour cream sauce and garnish with chopped dill on serving platter."

Cabbage Rolls with Rice and Eggs
"Cook 1 to 1 1/2 c. rice in double its amount of court-bouillon. When cool, combine with 4 finely chopped or ground hard-boiled eggs, 2 diced onions sauteed in 2 T butter, 1 raw egg, and 2-3 T chopped dill. Mix well and season with salt and pepper. Fill cabbage leaves and bake in roaster (with 2 c. cabbage water added) at 350 for 1 1/2 hours. Serve with sour cream sauce or tomato sauce."

histoireinsolite There are a few meatless versions in the recipe book I was using! I think most of them are mushroom-based, but there are some made mostly with egg and/or farmer’s cheese. I can pass along some of the recipes if you’re interested? I haven’t tried any of the meatless ones, but I’m sure they’re good!